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Learning Objectives


 Develop English language skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing by having learners engage in a range of communicative tasks and activities.

 Encourage the use of strategies, such as contextualization of new vocabulary, use of previewing, skimming and scanning techniques, and knowledge of text organization and discourse markers, to aid the comprehension of written and spoken language.

 Expand the learner’s use of grammatically correct, situation-based and culturally appropriate language in speaking and writing for effective communication in a variety of interpersonal and academic situations.

 Create awareness about learning styles and different learning resources, encourage the adoption of study skills, and increase competence in the use of technology so that learners may more effectively achieve academic goals.

 Build cross-cultural understanding and confidence in using language through collaboration with classmates, increased participation in activities, and increased interaction within the institution and the larger community.




Course Duration:

Course Duration: 1 week to 3 weeks student

Course Requirements:

1. Basic knowledge in the English language and the skills needed to perform well in their whole course duration.

2. ESL level of Upper Beginner and Above



SUBJECT DETAILS
READING The student will study the reading section which consists of questions on 3-5 passages, each approximately 700 words in length. The student will study the passages which are academic topics; they are the kind of material that might be found in an undergraduate university textbook. Passages require understanding of rhetorical functions such as cause-effect, compare-contrast and argumentation. Students will answer questions about main ideas, details, inferences, essential information, sentence insertion, vocabulary, rhetorical purpose and overall ideas. New types of questions in the TOEFL iBT test require filling out tables or completing summaries to which the student will also learn.
LISTENING The student will learn the listening section which consists of questions on six passages, each 3–5 minutes in length. These passages include two student conversations and four academic lectures or discussions. The conversations involve a student and either a professor or a campus service provider. The lectures are a self-contained portion of an academic lecture, which may involve student participation and does not assume specialized background knowledge in the subject area. Each conversation and lecture passage is heard only once. Test-takers may take notes while they listen and they may refer to their notes when they answer the questions. Each conversation is associated with five questions and each lecture with six. The questions are meant to measure the ability to understand main ideas, important details, implications, relationships between ideas, organization of information, speaker purpose and speaker attitude.
WRITING The Writing section measures a test taker's ability to write in an academic setting and consists of two tasks: one integrated and one independent. In the integrated task, test-takers read a passage on an academic topic and then listen to a speaker discuss it. The test-taker then writes a summary about the important points in the listening passage and explains how these relate to the key points of the reading passage. In the independent task, the test-taker must write an essay that states their opinion or choice, and then explain it, rather than simply listing personal preferences or choices.
SPEAKING The Speaking section consists of six tasks: two independent and four integrated. In the two independent tasks, test-takers answer opinion questions on familiar topics. They are evaluated on their ability to speak spontaneously and convey their ideas clearly and coherently. In two of the integrated tasks, test-takers read a short passage, listen to an academic course lecture or a conversation about campus life and answer a question by combining appropriate information from the text and the talk. In the two remaining integrated tasks, test-takers listen to an academic course lecture or a conversation about campus life and then respond to a question about what they heard. In the integrated tasks, test-takers are evaluated on their ability to appropriately synthesize and effectively convey information from the reading and listening material. Test-takers may take notes as they read and listen and may use their notes to help prepare their responses. Test-takers are given a short preparation time before they have to begin speaking.